Monthly Archives: October 2018

DECCMA releases a summary of its key findings on climate change, migration and adaptation

As it nears the end of its 4.5 year lifespan, the Deltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation (DECCMA) project has released a summary of its key findings on climate change, migration and adaptation. Deltas are home to 500 million people worldwide and play a key role in the economies of countries. Climate change exacerbates environmental change due to sea level rise, salinisation, flooding and coastal erosion, and different levels of social vulnerability create different risk profiles (including for men and women). Migration has long been evident in deltas (primarily from rural areas to urban areas) but environmental change alters the context in which migration decisions are taken, particularly when environmental factors reduce the ability to earn a living. As mobile environments, adaptation has always occurred, but more is likely to be required in the future. The publication also outlines some of DECCMA policy impacts building achievements. Kulima's role in DECCMA has been to ensure integration of gender, champion research impact activities, and contribute to adaptation research.

Kulima hosting a writeshop on climate services for the UMFULA project

This week Kulima is hosting a writeshop in South Africa for members of the UMFULA project (under the Future Climate For Africa programme). The writeshop will be attended by team members from the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, University of Leeds and University of Kwazulu Natal. The aim is to compare, contrast and synthesise findings from research conducted in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. Planned papers relate to the political economy of climate change in each country, insights into effective and equitable adaptation options for small-scale commodity (tea and sugar) farmers, and analysis of how to best visualise climate information so that the intended message is effectively understood by planners.

New open access paper “How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?”

A new paper "How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?" has just been made available online in the journal Environmental Science and Policy. The paper, led by Joanna Pardoe with Katharine Vincent and Declan Conway, is an output of the UMFULA (Future Climate for Africa) project, and is based on self-determination theory surveys that were conducted with government officials in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. The study finds that whilst external influences and hierarchical structures are recognised, these do not have a strong direct influence on staff motivation to respond to climate change, but they do appear to inhibit capacities to act. Lack of staff and limited government-allocated budget reduce the ability of ministries to be self-determined and set their own agendas, as they create a dependence on donor-determined projects.