Monthly Archives: October 2020

Building Resilience and Adapting to Climate Change in Malawi commemorates International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction

The Building Resilience and Adapting to Climate Change programme in Malawi, in which Kulima is part of the Knowledge and Policy Hub, commemorated International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction last week by releasing a brief and other pieces. The brief, a joint output with the Civil Society Network on Climate Change (CISONECC), addresses "Why invest in resilience?" and consolidates existing evidence for the cost-effectiveness of investing in disaster risk reduction and resilience-building. This was accompanied by a blog on the CDKN website "Spotlight this Disaster Risk Reduction Day on Malawi" and opinion article in the Daily Times Malawi "Why Disaster Risk Reduction is more important than ever" – both of which highlight the need to finalise the DRM Bill and create a budget line for Disaster Risk Reduction in the country.  

“Evolution of national climate adaptation agendas in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia: the role of national leadership and international donors” now published-with inputs from Kulima

An output of the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project has just been published. "Evolution of national climate adaptation agendas in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia: the role of national leadership and international donors" unpacks the ways in which political economy has affected the emergence and evolution of national climate adaptation planning in three sub-Saharan African countries over the last decade, based on data collection over a six year period. Despite variation in the specifics of how they operated, the roles of two factors in common emerge in the evolution of the climate change adaptation agendas: national leadership and allied political priorities, and the role of additional funding provided by donors. These influences lead to changes in the policy and institutional frameworks for addressing climate change, as well as in the emphasis placed on climate change adaptation. By examining the different ways through which ideas, power and resources converge and by learning from the specific configurations in the country examples, the paper identifies opportunities to address existing barriers to action and thus present implications that enable more effective adaptation planning in other countries. 

“Managing collaborative research: insights from a multi-consortium programme on climate adaptation across Africa and South Asia” now published-with inputs from Kulima

Another paper has just been produced that reflects on the process of conducting collaborative applied adaptation research under the Collaborative Adaptation Research in Africa and Asia (CARIAA) programme. "Managing collaborative research: insights from a multi-consortium programme on climate adaptation across Africa and South Asia", led by Bruce-Currie Alder with Georgina Cundill, Lucia Scodanibbio, Kulima director Katharine Vincent, Anjal Prakash and Nathalie Nathe, reflects on CARIAA's learnings in fostering cooperation towards research outcomes, coordinating Participants valued the consortium as a network that provided connections with distinct sources of expertise, as a means to gain experience and skills beyond the remit of their home organisation. Consortia were seen as an avenue for reaching scale both in terms of working across regions, as well as in terms of moving research into practice. The experience of CARIAA affirms documented strategies for collaborative research, including project vision, partner compatibility, skilled managers, and multi-level planning. Collaborative research also needs an ability to revise membership and structures as needed in response to changing involvement of partners over time.