Tag Archives: Adaptation

“Adaptation pathways: A review of approaches and a learning framework” New paper in Environmental Science and Policy, with inputs from Kulima

A new paper "Adaptation pathways: A review of approaches and a learning framework" has just been published in the journal Environmental Science and Policy. The paper, led by Saskia Werners with Russell Wise, James Butler, Edmond Totin and Katharine Vincent, is an output of the recently-finished Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia. Based on a review of the literature, the paper finds three clusters of approaches to adaptation pathways, namely (a) performance-threshold oriented, (b) multi-stakeholder oriented, and (c) transformation oriented, each of which broadly corresponds to three desired outcomes of pathways development, namely (i) meeting short and long-term adaptation needs, (ii) promoting collaborative learning, adaptive planning and adaptive capacity, (iii) accounting for complexity and long-term change, including a potential need for transformation. Based on the review, a learning framework then presents a number of propositions to guide systematic reflection about why and how adaptation pathways are developed. 

“Reflections on a key component of co-producing climate services: Defining climate metrics from user needs” New paper from the UMFULA project, led by Kulima

An output of the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project has just been published in Climate Services journal. "Reflections on a key component of co-producing climate services: Defining climate metrics from user needs" was led by Katharine Vincent, with Emma Archer, Rebecka Henriksson, Joanna Pardoe and Neha Mittal. It is a methodological piece that unpacks the iterative process applied within UMFULA to determine what climate information would be of use to our partners in the water and agriculture sectors to better plan for the impacts of climate change over a 5-40 year period. It discusses how the choice and application of four existing social science methods (interview-informed role play workshop, open-ended interviews, prioritised surveys and enhanced surveys) arose out of, and was in turn embedded within, a different epistemological approach characteristic of co-production, and reflect on the evolution of our understanding of co-production as our assumptions were challenged, from the expectation that we would be able to “obtain” metrics from users, to a dynamic mutual definition based on better understanding of the decision-making contexts.

“Understanding gender differences in availability, accessibility and use of climate information among smallholder farmers in Malawi” New paper from the UMFULA project with inputs from Kulima

A new paper "Understanding gender differences in availability, accessibility and use of climate information among smallholder farmers in Malawi" has just been published in Climate and Development. The paper, led by Dr Rebecka Henriksson with inputs from Katharine Vincent, is an output of the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project. Ensuring smallholder farmers have access to climate information is important to enable adaptation, but access to it is strongly gendered. This study shows that both women prefer radio to access forecasts, but that women also like to access forecasts through a knowledge broker. Those farmers with higher levels of education (mostly men) prefer to also obtain forecasts via internet and cell phone. Understanding gendered preferences and barriers to climate information access is crucial for benefits of adaptation to be accessed equitably.

Cost estimate for the implementation of South Africa’s National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy released-with inputs from Kulima

South Africa's Department for Environment, Forestry and Fisheries has just released the Cost Estimate for Implementation of the National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy. The cost estimate was conducted by a team led by Cowater International that included Kulima director, Katharine Vincent, as the climate adaptation expert. The costing relies on an innovative methodology that involved scoping the activities on the short, medium and long timeframe within the 10 year implementation period, then costing them based on available data, accounting for inflation. Costing data is available per intevention, with breakdown by activity, and all assumptions around scope are transparent to show how figures were arrived at.

Kulima facilitated a remote validation workshop for the IGAD Strategy for Mainstreaming Gender in Disaster Risk Management and Climate Change Adaptation

Yesterday Dr Katharine Vincent and colleagues from Cowater International facilitated a remote validation workshop for a Regional Strategy for Mainstreaming Gender in Disaster Risk Management and Climate Change Adaptation for the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) region. The validation, which was intended to take place face-to-face prior to Covid19-imposed travel restrictions, successfully brought together participants from the IGAD Secretariat, ICPAC, and the member states of Djibouti, Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, South Sudan, Kenya and Uganda. The strategy is aligned with the Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction and the draft IGAD Disaster Risk Management Strategy, together with relevant international and continental gender commitments. It has been based on international good practice and priorities identified through earlier consultations with government and non-government stakeholders in the IGAD Secretariat and among the member states.

New report-Enabling climate science use to better support resilience and adaptation practice-with inputs from Kulima

A new report – Enabling climate science use to better support resilience and adaptation practice. Rapid evidence assessment for the CLARE programme – has been released. The report was commissioned as part of a series of scoping reports to inform the design of DFID's forthcoming Climate and Resilience Framework (CLARE) programme, and written by a team convened by LTS International, including Kulima director, Katharine Vincent. The rapid evidence scan aimed to answer the question "Within the process of enabling climate science to better support resilience and adaptation practice and achieve internationally agreed commitments, what is working and what is missing in its use, and which people and institutions are key contributors in this field?” It finds differences in timeframes of consideration of weather and climate information, and an ongoing persistent communication gap that impedes effective use in decision-making.

Kulima part of the Supporting Pastoralism and Agriculture in Recurrent and Protracted Crises (SPARC) programme team

Dr Katharine Vincent is part of the consortium implementing the DFID-funded Supporting Pastoralism and Agriculture in Recurrent and Protracted Crises (SPARC) programme. The consortium is led by Cowater International and includes ODI, ILRI and Mercy Corps. SPARC is a 6 year programme that aims to advance research on livelihoods, agriculture and pastoralism that can be used by DFID and other agencies to better design programmes to have an impact. SPARC's target countries include Burkina Faso, Chad, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Syria, Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Uganda and Yemen. Katharine's role is to lead the Gender, Equity and Social Inclusion component, ensuring that SPARC is able to deliver and inform equitable benefits. 

Kulima director participated in Living Deltas annual meeting and presented on gender and adaptation at an international seminar on global environmental challenges

Dr Katharine Vincent was in Kolkata last week, with 3 purposes. First, she participated in the annual meeting of the Living Deltas UKRI-GRCF Research Hub, on which she sits on the advisory board. Second, she delivered a presentation on gender and adaptation at an international seminar on global environmental challenges at the Women's Christian College. Third, she visited the Sundarbans delta with DECCMA colleagues from Jadavpur University to finetune how to most effectively apply research findings to support women's adaptation to climate change.

Kulima and University of Exeter commence a new project on “Responding to sea-level rise and storm events: A proposed framework for developing coastline adaptation strategies in southern Africa”

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Durban this week for the launch workshop of a new project "Responding to sea-level rise and storm events: A proposed framework for developing coastline adaptation strategies in southern Africa". The project is funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund and led by the University of Exeter, in partnership with Kulima, the University of KwaZulu Natal, University of the WitwatersrandEduardo Mondlane University and ICLEI (Local Governments for Sustainability-Africa). Over the next 6 months, the project will bring together a network of cross-disciplinary researchers, practitioners, stakeholders and policy makers to co-design a new framework for developing effective coastline adaptation strategies in southern Africa.

How can we effectively build capacity to adapt to climate change? Insights from Malawi in a new paper led by Kulima

A paper "How can we effectively build capacity to adapt to climate change? Insights from Malawi" has just been published in the journal Climate and Development. The paper, led by Diana Mataya with Katharine Vincent and Andy Dougill, reflects on Diana's Masters research undertaken as part of the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project. It highlights the complementary roles of long-term education and short-term training, and the underuse of methods such as action planning, on-the-job training and continued mentorship after training. Challenges that impede effective capacity building relate not only to training design and structure, but also the inadequacy of training needs assessments and the organizational structure in which trainees attempt to put their skills and knowledge into practice. The paper concludes that more rigorous coordination and monitoring of training efforts-and appropriate institutional support for action following training sessions are essential to enhance adaptation planning across sub-Saharan Africa.