Tag Archives: Climate Adaptation in Africa

“Evolution of national climate adaptation agendas in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia: the role of national leadership and international donors” now published-with inputs from Kulima

An output of the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project has just been published. "Evolution of national climate adaptation agendas in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia: the role of national leadership and international donors" unpacks the ways in which political economy has affected the emergence and evolution of national climate adaptation planning in three sub-Saharan African countries over the last decade, based on data collection over a six year period. Despite variation in the specifics of how they operated, the roles of two factors in common emerge in the evolution of the climate change adaptation agendas: national leadership and allied political priorities, and the role of additional funding provided by donors. These influences lead to changes in the policy and institutional frameworks for addressing climate change, as well as in the emphasis placed on climate change adaptation. By examining the different ways through which ideas, power and resources converge and by learning from the specific configurations in the country examples, the paper identifies opportunities to address existing barriers to action and thus present implications that enable more effective adaptation planning in other countries. 

Kulima participating in Greater Horn of Africa Climate Outlook Forum

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Mombasa this week to participate in the 54th edition of the Greater Horn of Africa Climate Forum and then a meeting of the Disaster Risk Management Technical Committee of IGAD. She will be presenting progress to date on the mainstreaming of gender into disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation for the IGAD region, which is being undertaken in partnership with Cowater International

Kulima director participating in Africa’s first Wikipedia edit-a-thon on climate change

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Cape Town this week to participate in Africa's first Wikipedia edit-a-thon on climate change. Hosted by CDKN and Future Climate For Africa, the event will bring together researchers from across the African continent who have been involved in a number of major research programmes so that they can update and create new pages to reflect their findings. With an average of 16 billion page views a month, Wikipedia is a common port-of-call for laypeople, and thus using the platform to communicate research findings can improve impact and also help to ensure quality and robustness of information. As she is involved in two major Africa-focused research programmes, Future Climate For Africa and Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia, Katharine's role will be to synthesise findings from across the participants into some of the broader thematic topics.

Kulima participating in costing of South Africa’s National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

Dr Katharine Vincent is working as part of a team led by CowaterSogema to cost South Africa's National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy (which also acts as the National Adaptation Plan under the UNFCCC). The aim of the costing exercise is to highlight the business case for investment in adaptation in South Africa, for use both within national government and to seek alternative sources of adaptation finance. The strategy has a 10 year lifespan as is due to be formally adopted in 2019. The team are applying mixed methods to cost the strategic interventions, which will then be presented to a stakeholder workshop prior to finalisation.

Kulima participating in UMFULA annual meeting in Dar es Salaam

Dr Katharine Vincent and Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema are representing Kulima this week at the annual meeting of the UMFULA project (part of the Future Climate For Africa programme) in Dar es Salaam. The meeting brings together the climate scientists, impact modellers and social scientists from the UK, South Africa, Malawi, Tanzania and Cameroon to feed back on research findings and, with less than a year until the end of the project, to synthesise emerging lessons. It will be followed by a range of stakeholder events, including presentations to the Tanzania Meteorological Agency and TANESCO (electricity company), and a student session at the University of Dar es Salaam.

Kulima working with Urban Earth to support adaptation projects in South African provinces

Dr Katharine Vincent is part of a project team led by Urban Earth which is working on an assignment as part of GIZ's Provincial Climate Change Support Programme. The aim is to support the development of adaptation project proposals from six of South Africa's provinces. Kwazulu Natal, Mpumulanga, Limpopo, Gauteng, Northwest and the Northern Cape have all identified priority projects out of their provincial adaptation strategies that are related to water and climate change. Kulima's role is input to the development of financial proposals based on appropriate adaptation finance sources. 

Kulima hosting a writeshop on climate services for the UMFULA project

This week Kulima is hosting a writeshop in South Africa for members of the UMFULA project (under the Future Climate For Africa programme). The writeshop will be attended by team members from the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, University of Leeds and University of Kwazulu Natal. The aim is to compare, contrast and synthesise findings from research conducted in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. Planned papers relate to the political economy of climate change in each country, insights into effective and equitable adaptation options for small-scale commodity (tea and sugar) farmers, and analysis of how to best visualise climate information so that the intended message is effectively understood by planners.

New open access paper “How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?”

A new paper "How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?" has just been made available online in the journal Environmental Science and Policy. The paper, led by Joanna Pardoe with Katharine Vincent and Declan Conway, is an output of the UMFULA (Future Climate for Africa) project, and is based on self-determination theory surveys that were conducted with government officials in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. The study finds that whilst external influences and hierarchical structures are recognised, these do not have a strong direct influence on staff motivation to respond to climate change, but they do appear to inhibit capacities to act. Lack of staff and limited government-allocated budget reduce the ability of ministries to be self-determined and set their own agendas, as they create a dependence on donor-determined projects.

New UMFULA paper released “Climate information needs in southern Africa: A review”

The Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy at the Grantham Research Institute of Climate Change and the Environment and the University of Leeds has released a new working paper as an output of the UMFULA project. Dr Katharine Vincent is an author of the working paper, entitled "Climate information needs in southern Africa. A review". The paper reviews the state of the landscape of available climate information, barriers to climate information use, and the climate information needs of different sectors in southern Africa. It draws on published literature, documentary evidence and primary research with decision makers in the Southern African Development Community.

“Developing and applying a five step process for mainstreaming climate change into local development plans: A case study from Zambia” now available in Climate Risk Management

A new paper "Developing and applying a five step process for mainstreaming climate change into local development plans: A case study from Zambia" has just been published in the journal Climate Risk Management. The paper outlines a process for mainstreaming climate change that was developed for use in the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience districts in western Zambia and applied during several workshops in 2017 for both district development plans and integrated development plans. The process can be used when planning from scratch and also when retrofitting existing plans.