Tag Archives: Malawi

New briefing paper “Policy coherence for sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa” with inputs from Kulima

The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (at the London School of Economics and Political Science) and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy has just released a briefing note "Policy coherence for sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa". The briefing note, written by Patrick Curran, Andy Dougill, Joanna Pardoe and Katharine Vincent, is based on a number of research papers produced under the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project, which have looked at policy coherence in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. It highlights how sub-optimal levels of coherence of policies and strategies relating to climate change (water, energy and food) could threaten the achievement of the Paris Agreement on climate change and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Kulima director in Kisumu for meeting of the GCRF project “Building research capacity for sustainable water and food security in sub-Saharan Africa”

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Kisumu in Kenya this week to participate in the a meeting of the "Building research capacity for sustainable water and food security in sub-Saharan Africa" (BRECcIA) project. BRECcIA is a four year project funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) and led by the University of Southampton. It aims to develop research capacity across institutions in Malawi, Kenya and Ghana that is self-sustaining and focused on improving food and water security for the poorest of society. Katharine is a member of the strategic advisory board for the project.

“Climate change adaptation and cross-sectoral policy coherence in southern Africa” just published in Regional Environmental Change

A new paper, "Climate change adaptation and cross-sectoral policy coherence in southern Africa" has just been published in Regional Environmental Change. The paper is an output of the UMFULA project, and was led by Matthew England from the University of Leeds with Kulima director, Dr Katharine Vincent, as one of the authors. Using the cases of Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia, the paper investigates the extent of coherence in national policies across the water and agriculture sectors and to climate change adaptation goals outlined in national development plans. Findings show that sector policies have differing degrees of coherence on climate change adaptation, currently being strongest in Zambia and weakest in Tanzania. Sectoral policies remain more coherent in addressing immediate-term disaster management issues of floods and droughts rather than longer-term strategies for climate adaptation. Policy coherence is more likely where there are cross-ministerial structures in place, for example Zambia's Interim Climate Change Secretariat. 

Kulima director participating in UMFULA writeshop on institutional responses to climate change

Dr Katharine Vincent is participating in a writeshop this week with her colleague on the UMFULA project (Future Climate For Africa programme), Dr Joanna Pardoe from the Grantham Research Institute for Climate and Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science. As part of the research into the use of climate information in decision-making, the UMFULA team has been investigating the institutional architecture around climate change in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. Additionally they have administered a survey to public sector staff in the three countries to investigate motivations and perceived agency to act on climate change issues. The writeshop will bring together some of these findings in two academic papers.

Kulima investigating the development of Malawi’s National Resilience Strategy

Katharine Vincent, Diana Mataya and Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema are working with colleagues from the University of Leeds and Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources to investigate the development of Malawi's National Resilience Strategy. The UMFULA project is looking at how decisions are made in order to identify how climate information may be used in the development of climate-resilient plans. The National Resilience Strategy in Malawi is a high level initiative that aims to bring together disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation and social protection to reduce the negative impacts of extreme events, such as droughts and floods. A forthcoming paper will assess the political economy of the strategy, and the ways in which it can bring together disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation. 

How can climate information build a resilient Malawi? Report published of a panel discussion on 2nd November

panel discussionOn 2nd November 2017, after the UMFULA annual meeting, a panel discussion co-hosted with the Civil Society Network on Climate Change and LUANAR was held in Lilongwe with the title "How can climate information build a resilient Malawi?"  UMFULA PI, Declan Conway (London School of Economics and Political Science), Director of the Department of Climate Change and Meteorological Services, Jolamu Nkhokwe and Deputy Director of the Environmental Affairs Department, Shamiso Najera, gave brief presentations. Responses were given by the panellists – Andy Dougill (University of Leeds), Elina Kululanga (Department of Climate Change and Meteorological Services), Julius Ng'oma (Civil Society Network on Climate Change) and Sothini Nyirenda (UNDP) – before the floor was opened to questions from the 60 partcipants. A report of the proceeedings is now available.

Taking stock and looking forward: UMFULA’s annual meeting and stakeholder events in Malawi


Taking stock and looking forward by Kulima on Exposure

UMFULA publishes a variety of outputs relating to climate information

understanding model outputsAt its annual meeting and stakeholder events last week in Malawi, UMFULA published a number of outputs relating to climate information. Climate briefs were presented for both Malawi and Tanzania, in which future climate projections are highlighted, based on 34 global climate models used by the IPCC (CMIP-5). As well as the main brief, there is also a 2 page summary for policy-makers, and an annex for more technical readers. In addition a guide was published on "How to understand and interpret global climate model results". This accompanies an earlier guide on "Climate models: what they show us and how they can be used in planning". There is also "Climate Risk and Vulnerability: A Handbook for Southern Africa", which was launched by CSIR and Kulima in October.

Kulima participating in UMFULA annual meeting in Malawi

workshopDr Katharine Vincent, Diana Mataya and Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema are in Mangochi this week, participating in the annual meeting of the UMFULA project, part of the Future Climate for Africa programme. The meeting brings together the climate scientists, impact modellers and social scientists from the UK, South Africa, Malawi, Tanzania and Cameroon. It will be followed by a range of stakeholder events in Malawi, including a lunch with directors from our government partners, a panel discussion on the role of climate information in building a resilient Malawi, and participation in the environment and climate change donor coordination committee, to see how UMFULA outputs can inform ongoing programming in the country.

Kulima continues to develop research on co-production

FCFA meetingKulima Integrated Development Solutions has been developing various threads of research into co-production. As part of the UMFULA project (Future Climate for Africa programme) a co-production approach has been attempted to develop climate information to inform decisions around water allocation in Tanzania and Malawi. At last week's FCFA conference Dr Katharine Vincent co-led a session exploring opportunities and challenges of co-production, and a cross-project publication is planned to document experiences to date in UMFULA, FRACTAL and AMMA-2050. In partnership with the Met Office, Kulima is also finalising a guidance document on co-production to inform the second phase of the Weather and Climate Information Services for Africa (WISER) programme.