Tag Archives: Malawi

New working paper led by Kulima “Creating useful and usable weather and climate information-Insights from Participatory Scenario Planning in Malawi

The Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy and the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment has just released a new working paper led by Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema and Katharine Vincent, with Rebecka Henriksson Malinga from the University of KwaZulu Natal. The paper, Creating useful and usable weather and climate information-Insights from Participatory Scenario Planning in Malawi, is an output of the Future Climate For Africa programme's UMFULA project. Based on qualitative research, it finds that advisories co-produced through the Participatory Scenario Planning process have been used by farmers to successfully reduce risk. However the scaling up and sustainability has been challenged by technical constraints relating to delays in the release of the national seasonal forecast and staff availability, and financial constraints which limit the extent to which the process can be carried out at district level. These challenges are reinforced by the lack of a policy framework.

UMFULA launches new brief projecting future water availability in Lake Malawi and the Shire River basin

The Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project has just released a new brief Projecting water availability in Lake Malawi and the Shire River basin. Led by Dr Ajay Bhave from the University of Leeds, the UMFULA research team has developed an open access water resources model (WEAP) that highlights potential future changes in Lake Malawi water levels and subsequent flows in the Shire River basin. Water availability has implications for energy (hydropower generation), food production (irrigation capacity) and environmental flows (for example through the maintenance of the Elephant Marsh wetland). Results indicate a range of potential futures, which illustrates the importance of adaptive decision-making approaches that are robust to uncertainty in supporting improved water management and infrastructure development in Malawi.

 

Kulima director in Malawi for annual meeting of GCRF Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Malawi this week to participate in the annual research meeting ot the GCRF Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project. BRECcIA aims to “strengthen individual research capabilities and institutional capacity in three countries: Kenya, Ghana and Malawi” and do this in order to carry out impactful and high-quality research that leads to positive changes in policy and practice for sustainable water and food security. Katharine is a member of the Strategic Advisory Board of the project, and will be providing inputs to the applicability of research findings in the region and to the complementarities with other related initiatives. 

Kulima participating in annual review meeting for the UMFULA project

Dr Katharine Vincent is joining colleagues from the Uncertainty Reduction in Models for Understanding Development Applications (UMFULA) project today for the annual review of progress with funders DFID and NERC. The meeting is taking place with the lead institution, the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science. As it nears the end of its lifespan, UMFULA has undertaken novel research into decision-making processes and the institutional structures that government climate change policy in southern Africa, and supported decision-making under uncertainty in the water-energy-food nexus in Malawi and Tanzania.

Kulima participating in UMFULA annual meeting in Dar es Salaam

Dr Katharine Vincent and Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema are representing Kulima this week at the annual meeting of the UMFULA project (part of the Future Climate For Africa programme) in Dar es Salaam. The meeting brings together the climate scientists, impact modellers and social scientists from the UK, South Africa, Malawi, Tanzania and Cameroon to feed back on research findings and, with less than a year until the end of the project, to synthesise emerging lessons. It will be followed by a range of stakeholder events, including presentations to the Tanzania Meteorological Agency and TANESCO (electricity company), and a student session at the University of Dar es Salaam.

Kulima hosting a writeshop on climate services for the UMFULA project

This week Kulima is hosting a writeshop in South Africa for members of the UMFULA project (under the Future Climate For Africa programme). The writeshop will be attended by team members from the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, University of Leeds and University of Kwazulu Natal. The aim is to compare, contrast and synthesise findings from research conducted in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. Planned papers relate to the political economy of climate change in each country, insights into effective and equitable adaptation options for small-scale commodity (tea and sugar) farmers, and analysis of how to best visualise climate information so that the intended message is effectively understood by planners.

New open access paper “How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?”

A new paper "How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?" has just been made available online in the journal Environmental Science and Policy. The paper, led by Joanna Pardoe with Katharine Vincent and Declan Conway, is an output of the UMFULA (Future Climate for Africa) project, and is based on self-determination theory surveys that were conducted with government officials in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. The study finds that whilst external influences and hierarchical structures are recognised, these do not have a strong direct influence on staff motivation to respond to climate change, but they do appear to inhibit capacities to act. Lack of staff and limited government-allocated budget reduce the ability of ministries to be self-determined and set their own agendas, as they create a dependence on donor-determined projects.

New briefing paper “Policy coherence for sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa” with inputs from Kulima

The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (at the London School of Economics and Political Science) and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy has just released a briefing note "Policy coherence for sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa". The briefing note, written by Patrick Curran, Andy Dougill, Joanna Pardoe and Katharine Vincent, is based on a number of research papers produced under the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project, which have looked at policy coherence in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. It highlights how sub-optimal levels of coherence of policies and strategies relating to climate change (water, energy and food) could threaten the achievement of the Paris Agreement on climate change and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Kulima director in Kisumu for meeting of the GCRF project “Building research capacity for sustainable water and food security in sub-Saharan Africa”

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Kisumu in Kenya this week to participate in the a meeting of the "Building research capacity for sustainable water and food security in sub-Saharan Africa" (BRECcIA) project. BRECcIA is a four year project funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) and led by the University of Southampton. It aims to develop research capacity across institutions in Malawi, Kenya and Ghana that is self-sustaining and focused on improving food and water security for the poorest of society. Katharine is a member of the strategic advisory board for the project.

“Climate change adaptation and cross-sectoral policy coherence in southern Africa” just published in Regional Environmental Change

A new paper, "Climate change adaptation and cross-sectoral policy coherence in southern Africa" has just been published in Regional Environmental Change. The paper is an output of the UMFULA project, and was led by Matthew England from the University of Leeds with Kulima director, Dr Katharine Vincent, as one of the authors. Using the cases of Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia, the paper investigates the extent of coherence in national policies across the water and agriculture sectors and to climate change adaptation goals outlined in national development plans. Findings show that sector policies have differing degrees of coherence on climate change adaptation, currently being strongest in Zambia and weakest in Tanzania. Sectoral policies remain more coherent in addressing immediate-term disaster management issues of floods and droughts rather than longer-term strategies for climate adaptation. Policy coherence is more likely where there are cross-ministerial structures in place, for example Zambia's Interim Climate Change Secretariat.