Tag Archives: Tanzania

New Grantham Research Institute working paper with inputs from Kulima-“Insurance as a catalyst for government climate planning?”

The Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy and the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment have just released a new working paper from the UMFULA project with inputs from Dr Katharine Vincent. The paper, Insurance as a catalyst for government climate planning? A framework for analysing drivers and barriers, tested against evidence emerging from Sub-Saharan Africa, explores how climate risk information emanating from insurance processes can support a move towards anticipatory climate risk management. Using information from insurers in Africa, as well as case studies of different types of insurance in Malawi, Tanzania and South Africa, it presents the underpinning political economy factors that influence the process of climate information uptake, highlighting that the clear scope for dynamic interaction between insurers and users can face many challenges that go beyond availability and suitability of data. These challenges include limited trust, unclear risk ownership or lack of incentives, even if there is motivation, risk-awareness and overall buy-in into the need to manage climate risks. All three cases show the importance of sustained engagement and capacity building to increase awareness of the role of insurance-related climate risk information and its potential benefits and uses.

‘The current and future climate of central and southern Africa: What we have learnt and what it means for decision-making in Malawi and Tanzania”-summary of UMFULA project released

After 4 years of research by a multi-disciplinary team and co-production in partnership with government staff, the UMFULA project has released a briefing note that discusses "The current and future climate of central and southern Africa: What we have learnt and what it means for decision-making in Malawi and Tanzania". It highlights how understanding the likely future characteristics of climate risk is a key component of adaptation and climate-resilient planning, but given future uncertainty it is important to design approaches that are strongly informed by local considerations and are robust to uncertainty. Choosing the right tools and approach for climate risk assessment and adaptation to suit the scale of the decision allows a suitable trade-off between robustness and resources  required (time and expertise) for analysis. In the medium term, policy decisions require careful cross-sectoral planning, particularly in cases involving large  investments, long life-times and irreversibility, where there is a strong argument for assessing resilience to future climate change (for example around water, energy and food in Malawi and Tanzania). Co-producing knowledge, as in UMFULA, contributes to building societal and institutional capacity to factor climate risks into long-term planning. It also builds the capacity of researchers to better understand real world decision contexts in which climate change is one of many important factors.

Kulima participating in annual review meeting for the UMFULA project

Dr Katharine Vincent is joining colleagues from the Uncertainty Reduction in Models for Understanding Development Applications (UMFULA) project today for the annual review of progress with funders DFID and NERC. The meeting is taking place with the lead institution, the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science. As it nears the end of its lifespan, UMFULA has undertaken novel research into decision-making processes and the institutional structures that government climate change policy in southern Africa, and supported decision-making under uncertainty in the water-energy-food nexus in Malawi and Tanzania.

Kulima participating in UMFULA annual meeting in Dar es Salaam

Dr Katharine Vincent and Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema are representing Kulima this week at the annual meeting of the UMFULA project (part of the Future Climate For Africa programme) in Dar es Salaam. The meeting brings together the climate scientists, impact modellers and social scientists from the UK, South Africa, Malawi, Tanzania and Cameroon to feed back on research findings and, with less than a year until the end of the project, to synthesise emerging lessons. It will be followed by a range of stakeholder events, including presentations to the Tanzania Meteorological Agency and TANESCO (electricity company), and a student session at the University of Dar es Salaam.

Kulima hosting a writeshop on climate services for the UMFULA project

This week Kulima is hosting a writeshop in South Africa for members of the UMFULA project (under the Future Climate For Africa programme). The writeshop will be attended by team members from the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, University of Leeds and University of Kwazulu Natal. The aim is to compare, contrast and synthesise findings from research conducted in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. Planned papers relate to the political economy of climate change in each country, insights into effective and equitable adaptation options for small-scale commodity (tea and sugar) farmers, and analysis of how to best visualise climate information so that the intended message is effectively understood by planners.

New open access paper “How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?”

A new paper "How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?" has just been made available online in the journal Environmental Science and Policy. The paper, led by Joanna Pardoe with Katharine Vincent and Declan Conway, is an output of the UMFULA (Future Climate for Africa) project, and is based on self-determination theory surveys that were conducted with government officials in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. The study finds that whilst external influences and hierarchical structures are recognised, these do not have a strong direct influence on staff motivation to respond to climate change, but they do appear to inhibit capacities to act. Lack of staff and limited government-allocated budget reduce the ability of ministries to be self-determined and set their own agendas, as they create a dependence on donor-determined projects.

New briefing paper “Policy coherence for sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa” with inputs from Kulima

The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (at the London School of Economics and Political Science) and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy has just released a briefing note "Policy coherence for sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa". The briefing note, written by Patrick Curran, Andy Dougill, Joanna Pardoe and Katharine Vincent, is based on a number of research papers produced under the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project, which have looked at policy coherence in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. It highlights how sub-optimal levels of coherence of policies and strategies relating to climate change (water, energy and food) could threaten the achievement of the Paris Agreement on climate change and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Kulima director participated in gender and migration field school for the Western Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research (WIoDER) network

In late May Dr Katharine Vincent participated in a gender and migration field school under the Western Indian Ocean Delta Exchange and Research (WIoDER) network. WIoDER is a network comprising four deltas in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagacar and has training of postgraduate students as a core aim. The gender and migration field school brought together Masters and PhD students from Kenya, Madagascar and Tanzania and provided classroom and field-based training in gender-sensitive participatory rural appraisal methods in the Rufiji delta, Tanzania. It formed part of a series of 5 thematic field schools, on livelihoods, biodiversity, mangroves and hydrology. 

“Climate change adaptation and cross-sectoral policy coherence in southern Africa” just published in Regional Environmental Change

A new paper, "Climate change adaptation and cross-sectoral policy coherence in southern Africa" has just been published in Regional Environmental Change. The paper is an output of the UMFULA project, and was led by Matthew England from the University of Leeds with Kulima director, Dr Katharine Vincent, as one of the authors. Using the cases of Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia, the paper investigates the extent of coherence in national policies across the water and agriculture sectors and to climate change adaptation goals outlined in national development plans. Findings show that sector policies have differing degrees of coherence on climate change adaptation, currently being strongest in Zambia and weakest in Tanzania. Sectoral policies remain more coherent in addressing immediate-term disaster management issues of floods and droughts rather than longer-term strategies for climate adaptation. Policy coherence is more likely where there are cross-ministerial structures in place, for example Zambia's Interim Climate Change Secretariat. 

Kulima director participating in UMFULA writeshop on institutional responses to climate change

Dr Katharine Vincent is participating in a writeshop this week with her colleague on the UMFULA project (Future Climate For Africa programme), Dr Joanna Pardoe from the Grantham Research Institute for Climate and Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science. As part of the research into the use of climate information in decision-making, the UMFULA team has been investigating the institutional architecture around climate change in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. Additionally they have administered a survey to public sector staff in the three countries to investigate motivations and perceived agency to act on climate change issues. The writeshop will bring together some of these findings in two academic papers.