Tag Archives: water-energy-food

Kulima participating in UMFULA project writeshop in Pretoria

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Pretoria this week, joining colleagues Professor Andy Dougill from the University of Leeds and Professor Emma Archer from the University of Pretoria for a writeshop on the UMFULA project. As it comes to the end of its lifespan, they will synthesise key findings on climate information for medium-term planning in the water, energy and agriculture sectors for Malawi, taking into account the current policy and institutional context and information needs of the new National Planning Commission. 

Kulima participating in annual review meeting for the UMFULA project

Dr Katharine Vincent is joining colleagues from the Uncertainty Reduction in Models for Understanding Development Applications (UMFULA) project today for the annual review of progress with funders DFID and NERC. The meeting is taking place with the lead institution, the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science. As it nears the end of its lifespan, UMFULA has undertaken novel research into decision-making processes and the institutional structures that government climate change policy in southern Africa, and supported decision-making under uncertainty in the water-energy-food nexus in Malawi and Tanzania.

New paper on climate change and the water-energy-food nexus in Tanzania

paperThe journal Climate Policy has now published online a paper "Climate change and the water–energy–food nexus: insights from policy and practice in Tanzania". The paper, led by Joanna Pardoe from the London School of Economics and Political Science, with Declan Conway, Emilinah Namaganda, Katharine Vincent, Andy Dougill and Japhet Kashaigili, is an output of the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project. The paper investigates how climate change is addressed in policy, how it is being mainstreamed into water, energy and agriculture sector policies, and the extent to which cross-sectoral links enable coordinated action. Whilst the agricultural and water sectors are increasingly integrating climate change, practical coordination remains relatively unsuccessful. Addressing the institutional barriers to coordination is important for coherent climate-resilient and sustainable development.