New paper with inputs from Kulima “A framework to analyse the implications of coastal transformation on inclusive development”

A new paper "A framework to analyse the implications of coastal transformation on inclusive development" has just been made available online in the journal Environmental Science and Policy. The paper, led by Natalie Suckall with co-authors Emma L. Tompkins and Kulima director Dr Katharine Vincent, is an an output of the IDRC and DFID-funded Deltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation (DECCMA) project. The paper applies an analytical framework based on ideas of inclusive development (defined as Access to resources; Allocation of both resources and the impacts associated with climate change; and, individual Subjective Wellbeing) to three different types of coastal transformation (protect, accommodate, retreat). It highlights that coastal transformations have different effects on different people; and that winners and losers are determined by whose agenda is taken into account in planning the transformation. This insight reinforces the need for further research on the impacts of coastal transformation, as without due care, policies designed to generate transformation can generate significant losers.

Kulima participating in costing of South Africa’s National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

Dr Katharine Vincent is working as part of a team led by CowaterSogema to cost South Africa's National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy (which also acts as the National Adaptation Plan under the UNFCCC). The aim of the costing exercise is to highlight the business case for investment in adaptation in South Africa, for use both within national government and to seek alternative sources of adaptation finance. The strategy has a 10 year lifespan as is due to be formally adopted in 2019. The team are applying mixed methods to cost the strategic interventions, which will then be presented to a stakeholder workshop prior to finalisation.

Kulima contributing to gender and climate change training in Botswana

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Gaborone this week, contributing to a day of training on gender and climate change. The workshop has been organised by the Botswana National Designated Authority, with the support of the Southern Africa Climate Finance Partnership (a programme supported by DFID and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation), and aims to build capacity to develop project concept notes and proposals that are successful in receiving resources from the Green Climate Fund. Katharine will be outlining the Green Climate Fund's Gender Policy and Action Plan, and running interactive exercises to enable participants to identify opportunities to make climate change projects gender-responsive.

Three new UMFULA blogs on the Future Climate For Africa website with inputs from Kulima

The Future Climate For Africa website features three blogs from the UMFULA project with inputs from Kulima. In "Lessons I took away from my first Adaptation Futures Conference" Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema reflects on what she learned at the meeting in Cape Town and its relevance for Malawi. In "Writeshops – key tools for generating outputs in international research projects" Joanna Pardoe (LSE), Katharine Vincent, Rebecka Henriksson Malinga (UKZN) and Neha Mittal (Leeds) reflect on the benefits of sitting together to work on a common output. In "What if applied research projects required a carbon budget, alongside a financial one?" Katharine Vincent considers one way of limiting carbon emissions in international projects.

New open access paper “What can climate services learn from theory and practice of co-production?”

A new paper "What can climate services learn from theory and practice of co-production?" has just been made available online in the journal Climate Services. The paper, led by Kulima director Dr Katharine Vincent with co-authors Meaghan Daly, Claire Scannell and Bill Leathes, is an output of two projects funded by DFIDUMFULA (Future Climate for Africa) and Weather and Climate Information Services for Africa (WISER). Co-produced climate services are increasingly recognised as a means of improving the effective generation and utilisation of climate information to inform decision-making and support adaptation to climate change, particularly in developing countries. The paper reviews the co-production literature in other science policy fields to distil some key principles to inform climate services. A co-produced climate service product should be decision-driven, process-based and time-managed, whilst the process of co-producing a climate service should be inclusive, collaborative and flexible. Illustrations are also provided of how these principles may be engaged in practice.

Kulima participating in UMFULA annual meeting in Dar es Salaam

Dr Katharine Vincent and Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema are representing Kulima this week at the annual meeting of the UMFULA project (part of the Future Climate For Africa programme) in Dar es Salaam. The meeting brings together the climate scientists, impact modellers and social scientists from the UK, South Africa, Malawi, Tanzania and Cameroon to feed back on research findings and, with less than a year until the end of the project, to synthesise emerging lessons. It will be followed by a range of stakeholder events, including presentations to the Tanzania Meteorological Agency and TANESCO (electricity company), and a student session at the University of Dar es Salaam.

Kulima working with Urban Earth to support adaptation projects in South African provinces

Dr Katharine Vincent is part of a project team led by Urban Earth which is working on an assignment as part of GIZ's Provincial Climate Change Support Programme. The aim is to support the development of adaptation project proposals from six of South Africa's provinces. Kwazulu Natal, Mpumulanga, Limpopo, Gauteng, Northwest and the Northern Cape have all identified priority projects out of their provincial adaptation strategies that are related to water and climate change. Kulima's role is input to the development of financial proposals based on appropriate adaptation finance sources. 

DECCMA releases a summary of its key findings on climate change, migration and adaptation

As it nears the end of its 4.5 year lifespan, the Deltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation (DECCMA) project has released a summary of its key findings on climate change, migration and adaptation. Deltas are home to 500 million people worldwide and play a key role in the economies of countries. Climate change exacerbates environmental change due to sea level rise, salinisation, flooding and coastal erosion, and different levels of social vulnerability create different risk profiles (including for men and women). Migration has long been evident in deltas (primarily from rural areas to urban areas) but environmental change alters the context in which migration decisions are taken, particularly when environmental factors reduce the ability to earn a living. As mobile environments, adaptation has always occurred, but more is likely to be required in the future. The publication also outlines some of DECCMA policy impacts building achievements. Kulima's role in DECCMA has been to ensure integration of gender, champion research impact activities, and contribute to adaptation research.

Kulima hosting a writeshop on climate services for the UMFULA project

This week Kulima is hosting a writeshop in South Africa for members of the UMFULA project (under the Future Climate For Africa programme). The writeshop will be attended by team members from the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, University of Leeds and University of Kwazulu Natal. The aim is to compare, contrast and synthesise findings from research conducted in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. Planned papers relate to the political economy of climate change in each country, insights into effective and equitable adaptation options for small-scale commodity (tea and sugar) farmers, and analysis of how to best visualise climate information so that the intended message is effectively understood by planners.

New open access paper “How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?”

A new paper "How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?" has just been made available online in the journal Environmental Science and Policy. The paper, led by Joanna Pardoe with Katharine Vincent and Declan Conway, is an output of the UMFULA (Future Climate for Africa) project, and is based on self-determination theory surveys that were conducted with government officials in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. The study finds that whilst external influences and hierarchical structures are recognised, these do not have a strong direct influence on staff motivation to respond to climate change, but they do appear to inhibit capacities to act. Lack of staff and limited government-allocated budget reduce the ability of ministries to be self-determined and set their own agendas, as they create a dependence on donor-determined projects.