Tag Archives: adaptation planning

“The evolution of empirical adaptation research in the global South from 2010 to 2020” New paper in Climate and Development, led by Kulima

A new paper "The evolution of empirical adaptation research in the global South from 2010-2020" has just been published in the journal Climate and Development. The paper, by Katharine Vincent and Georgina Cundill, applies a scoping review approach to three leading adaptation journals covering different scales of analysis (Global Environmental Change, Regional Environmental Change and Climate and Development) to assess how empirical adaptation research in the global South has evolved over the last decade. The review shows that the quantity of empirical adaptation research has increased and that it covers both policy and practice and also different scales (from supranational down to individual level). There is significant and growing interest in the determinants of adaptation and adaptive capacity (including the role of barriers and enablers), and a small but growing interest in the role of gender. The overall increase in total publications does not show even geographical or sectoral coverage. Large swathes of sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East/North Africa remain severely under-researched; and the overwhelming majority of papers focus on rural and agricultural issues rather than cities. This analysis offers tangible evidence to highlight where geographical and thematic gaps exist in our research on adaptation in the global South.

“Adaptation pathways: A review of approaches and a learning framework” New paper in Environmental Science and Policy, with inputs from Kulima

A new paper "Adaptation pathways: A review of approaches and a learning framework" has just been published in the journal Environmental Science and Policy. The paper, led by Saskia Werners with Russell Wise, James Butler, Edmond Totin and Katharine Vincent, is an output of the recently-finished Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia. Based on a review of the literature, the paper finds three clusters of approaches to adaptation pathways, namely (a) performance-threshold oriented, (b) multi-stakeholder oriented, and (c) transformation oriented, each of which broadly corresponds to three desired outcomes of pathways development, namely (i) meeting short and long-term adaptation needs, (ii) promoting collaborative learning, adaptive planning and adaptive capacity, (iii) accounting for complexity and long-term change, including a potential need for transformation. Based on the review, a learning framework then presents a number of propositions to guide systematic reflection about why and how adaptation pathways are developed. 

New report-Enabling climate science use to better support resilience and adaptation practice-with inputs from Kulima

A new report – Enabling climate science use to better support resilience and adaptation practice. Rapid evidence assessment for the CLARE programme – has been released. The report was commissioned as part of a series of scoping reports to inform the design of DFID's forthcoming Climate and Resilience Framework (CLARE) programme, and written by a team convened by LTS International, including Kulima director, Katharine Vincent. The rapid evidence scan aimed to answer the question "Within the process of enabling climate science to better support resilience and adaptation practice and achieve internationally agreed commitments, what is working and what is missing in its use, and which people and institutions are key contributors in this field?” It finds differences in timeframes of consideration of weather and climate information, and an ongoing persistent communication gap that impedes effective use in decision-making.

UMFULA project produces country brief “How can we improve the use of information for a climate-resilient Malawi?” with inputs from Kulima

The UMFULA project under the Future Climate For Africa programme has summarised the findings of its research in Malawi into a country brief (How can we improve the use of information for a climate-resilient Malawi?), aimed to inform decision-makers on how climate infromation can be used to build a resilient Malawi. Malawi’s geographical location, between the east and southern African climate systems, means that future climate (particularly rainfall) is challenging to predict accurately – although there are areas of agreement in climate models, notably higher temperatures and higher likelihood of extreme weather events. Given future uncertainty, it is important to design robust management options that work across the plausible range of future climate conditions. This is especially the case for large investments with long life-times, significant impacts and irreversibility, such as water-related infrastructure (e.g. hydropower or irrigation) and agricultural investments in crop-breeding. The recently-finalised National Resilience Strategy provides a policy framework to enable this, but there is also a need for coherence between sectoral policies (for example relating to agriculture, irrigation, water and energy), which requires a more supportive institutional environment for sustainable and resilient decision-making.

Kulima participating in presentation of UMFULA project at the University of KwaZulu Natal

The UMFULA project (under the Future Climate For Africa programme) is holding meetings this week at the University of KwaZulu Natal in which Dr Katharine Vincent is participating. This includes supervision of Honours and Masters students researching water issues among commodity farmers and a writeshop to develop a paper on the use of weather and climate information by small-scale sugar contract farmers in Malawi. On Tuesday Katharine will participate in a Research on Tap Seminar at the Centre for Water Resources Research, together with Emma Archer, Rebecka Henriksson Malinga and several students, in which they will present some of the project's findings on the use of climate information in medium-term planning decisions and the case study in Malawi.

New open access paper “How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?”

A new paper "How do staff motivation and workplace environment affect capacity of governments to adapt to climate change in developing countries?" has just been made available online in the journal Environmental Science and Policy. The paper, led by Joanna Pardoe with Katharine Vincent and Declan Conway, is an output of the UMFULA (Future Climate for Africa) project, and is based on self-determination theory surveys that were conducted with government officials in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. The study finds that whilst external influences and hierarchical structures are recognised, these do not have a strong direct influence on staff motivation to respond to climate change, but they do appear to inhibit capacities to act. Lack of staff and limited government-allocated budget reduce the ability of ministries to be self-determined and set their own agendas, as they create a dependence on donor-determined projects.

Kulima director running adaptation training with WWF in Nairobi

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Nairobi this week running training for WWF's Africa Adaptation Initiative. The training will bring together representatives of WWF offices and their civil society partners from across the continent, including Mozambique, Madagascar, Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Cameroon, and DRC. In terms of content it will cover vulnerability risk assessments, mainstreaming climate change, identifying and selecting between adaptation options, and accessing adaptation finance. 

Kulima director running climate resilience mainstreaming workshops in Zambia

mainstreaming workshopDr Katharine Vincent is in Zambia at the moment to run a series of climate resilience mainstreaming workshops. 14 districts in the Western and Southern provinces, forming part of the Barotse sub-basin of the Zambezi river, are mainstreaming their District and Ward Development Plans for climate resilience. Once this is complete, they will be able to apply for adaptation grants from the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience to support implementation of their activities. Demonstration workshops have been run for Kaoma, Nalolo and Sioma districts; and Simakumba, Muoyo and Mbeta wards.

Kulima director in Rwanda to assess adaptation planning and climate finance absorption capacity

plumsDr Katharine Vincent is in Rwanda this week to investigate the status of adaptation planning and climate finance absorption capacity as part of a project for the AU Specialist Agency, African Risk CapacityThe project, funded by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network and undertaken in partnership with the Frankfurt School (UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate and Sustainable Energy Finance), is part of ARC's scoping for a new insurance product – the Extreme Climate Facility (XCF). XCF is intended to complement other climate finance mechanisms by funding adaptation and disaster risk reduction in participating countries. The project is assessing the state of adaptation planning and climate finance absorption capacity in seven African countries, and this visit follows last week's on to Kenya, and an earlier one to Malawi.

Kulima director in Kenya to assess adaptation planning and climate finance absorption capacity

fishing boats on LamuDr Katharine Vincent is in Kenya this week to investigate the status of adaptation planning and climate finance absorption capacity as part of a project for the AU Specialist Agency, African Risk Capacity. The project, funded by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network and undertaken in partnership with the Frankfurt School (UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate and Sustainable Energy Finance), is part of ARC's scoping for a new insurance product – the Extreme Climate Facility (XCF). XCF is intended to complement other climate finance mechanisms by funding adaptation and disaster risk reduction in participating countries. The project is assessing the state of adaptation planning and climate finance absorption capacity in seven African countries, and this visit to Kenya follows an earlier one to Malawi.