Tag Archives: climate change

“Toward a climate mobilities research agenda: Intersectionality, immobility and policy responses” New paper with inputs from Kulima

A new paper “Toward a climate mobilities research agenda: Intersectionality, immobility and policy responses” has just been published in the journal Global Environmental Change. The paper, led by Georgina Cundill with a team that included Katharine Vincent, draws on research conducted across a variety of contexts conducted under the Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia, highlighting the prevalence of in-country and short distance migration over international migration.

Mobility is a key livelihood and risk management strategy, including in the context of climate change. The
COVID-19 pandemic has reinforced long standing concerns that migrant populations remain largely overlooked in economic development, adaptation to climate change, and spatial planning. The paper calls for a more focused climate mobilities research agenda that includes understanding of multiple drivers of mobility and multi-directional movement; intersecting social factors that determine mobility for some and immobility for others; and the implications for mobility and immobility under climate change and the Covid-19 recovery.

“A framework for examining justice in food system transformations research” New paper with inputs from Kulima

A new paper “A framework for examining justice in food system transformations research” has just been published in the journal Nature Food. The paper, led by Stephen Whitfield with a team that included Katharine Vincent, calls for critical analysis of the justice implications of food system transformation. It does this by presenting a framework of three justice lenses — historical, representational and distributional — that can be adopted when thinking across the temporal dimensions of food system transformation.

The paper highlights that food system transformation and justice are subjects of research, recognising that drivers of transformation are both internal and external to the food system and that they evolve dynamically over time. It also points to the fact that research in a transformative space requires researchers to play a key role in supporting inclusive dialogues and showing awareness of their own role in framing discussions.

New project launch “Supporting Pastoralism and Agriculture in Recurrent and Protracted Crises” (SPARC)

This week the Supporting Pastoralism and Agriculture in Recurrent and Protracted Crises (SPARC) research programme has been launched. Led by Cowater, ODI, the International Livestock Research Institute and Mercy Corps and funded by FCDO, the six-year programme will develop and share knowledge to help the international development community better assist pastoralists, agro-pastoralists and farmers living with climate change, protracted crises and ongoing conflicts.

Partnering with local researchers and organisations, as well as drawing on the expertise of its core partners, SPARC is generating knowledge to build the resilience of millions of people living in agricultural, pastoral and transitional communities in the drylands stretching from east to west Africa. Kulima director, Dr Katharine Vincent, is part of the programme management team as the Gender Equality and Social Inclusion Advisor.

Biemruok Cattle Camp Bentiu South Sudan – image by UNMISS – CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

“Climate variability affects water-energy-food infrastructure performance in East Africa” New paper with inputs from Kulima

A new paper “Climate variability affects water-energy-food infrastructure performance in East Africa” has just been published in the journal One Earth. The paper, led by Christian Siderius with other members of the UMFULA project team, including Katharine Vincent, highlights how climate variability is poorly understood in East Africa’s climate transition zone, where variability in rainfall is projected to increase. The implications of these projected changes in climate on infrastructure performance are poorly understood, with implications for the water, energy and food sectors.

graphical abstract

Infrastructure design should take into consideration the potential for changes in climate variability and recognise the limitations of planning on the basis of short time series of observations or projections. In the Rufiji basin in Tanzania and Shire basin in Malawi, a repeat of an early-20th century multi-year drought would challenge the viability of proposed infrastructure (dams). A long view, which emphasizes past and future changes in variability, set within a broader context of climate information interpretation and decision-making, is crucial for screening the risk to infrastructure and informing contingency planning to manage climate risk.

Future Climate For Africa and CDKN release guide on how to contribute climate change information to Wikipedia, with inputs from Kulima

Future Climate For Africa and CDKN have just released How to contribute climate change information to Wikipedia: A guide for researchers, practitioners and communicators. The guide, by Emma Baker, Lisa McNamara, Beth Mackay and Kulima director, Dr Katharine Vincent, builds on Africa's first Wikipedia edit-a-thon on climate change in Africa, held in August 2019. The guide targets researchers, practitioners, communicators and any others with access to climate change information who would like to share it more widely with the world. It outlines how to edit Wikipedia, along with tips and suggestions on style and structure, and guidance on how to get involved with the Wikipedia editing community.

Kulima director participated in Living Deltas annual meeting and presented on gender and adaptation at an international seminar on global environmental challenges

Dr Katharine Vincent was in Kolkata last week, with 3 purposes. First, she participated in the annual meeting of the Living Deltas UKRI-GRCF Research Hub, on which she sits on the advisory board. Second, she delivered a presentation on gender and adaptation at an international seminar on global environmental challenges at the Women's Christian College. Third, she visited the Sundarbans delta with DECCMA colleagues from Jadavpur University to finetune how to most effectively apply research findings to support women's adaptation to climate change.

How can we effectively build capacity to adapt to climate change? Insights from Malawi in a new paper led by Kulima

A paper "How can we effectively build capacity to adapt to climate change? Insights from Malawi" has just been published in the journal Climate and Development. The paper, led by Diana Mataya with Katharine Vincent and Andy Dougill, reflects on Diana's Masters research undertaken as part of the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project. It highlights the complementary roles of long-term education and short-term training, and the underuse of methods such as action planning, on-the-job training and continued mentorship after training. Challenges that impede effective capacity building relate not only to training design and structure, but also the inadequacy of training needs assessments and the organizational structure in which trainees attempt to put their skills and knowledge into practice. The paper concludes that more rigorous coordination and monitoring of training efforts-and appropriate institutional support for action following training sessions are essential to enhance adaptation planning across sub-Saharan Africa.

“A qualitative comparative analysis of women’s agency and adaptive capacity in climate change hotspots in Asia and Africa” published in Nature Climate Change with inputs from Kulima

A new paper "A qualitative comparative analysis of women’s agency and adaptive capacity in climate change hotspots in Asia and Africa" has just been published in Nature Climate Change. The paper, led by Nitya Rao with Arabinda Mishra, Anjal Prakash, Chandni Singh, Ayesha Qaisrani, Prathigna Poonacha, Katharine Vincent and Claire Bedelian, is an outcome of the Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia, in which Kulima participated through the Deltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation project. The paper draws on data from 25 case studies across Africa and Asia to show how and in what ways women’s agency, or the ability to make meaningful choices and strategic decisions, contributes to adaptation responses. It shows how environmental stress is a key depressor of women’s agency even when household structures and social norms are supportive or legal entitlements are available.

IPCC SRCCL available for download

The latest IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Land (full name-Climate Change and Land: an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems) was released after plenary approval on 8th August 2019. The Summary for Policy Makers and all chapters are now available for download. Dr Katharine Vincent was a contributing author to chapter 4 on land degradation and the cross-chapter box 11 on gender in inclusive approaches to climate change, land, and sustainable development, which features in chapter 7 (p66).

Kulima director participating in Africa’s first Wikipedia edit-a-thon on climate change

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Cape Town this week to participate in Africa's first Wikipedia edit-a-thon on climate change. Hosted by CDKN and Future Climate For Africa, the event will bring together researchers from across the African continent who have been involved in a number of major research programmes so that they can update and create new pages to reflect their findings. With an average of 16 billion page views a month, Wikipedia is a common port-of-call for laypeople, and thus using the platform to communicate research findings can improve impact and also help to ensure quality and robustness of information. As she is involved in two major Africa-focused research programmes, Future Climate For Africa and Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia, Katharine's role will be to synthesise findings from across the participants into some of the broader thematic topics.