Tag Archives: climate change

IPCC SRCCL available for download

The latest IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Land (full name-Climate Change and Land: an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems) was released after plenary approval on 8th August 2019. The Summary for Policy Makers and all chapters are now available for download. Dr Katharine Vincent was a contributing author to chapter 4 on land degradation and the cross-chapter box 11 on gender in inclusive approaches to climate change, land, and sustainable development, which features in chapter 7 (p66).

Kulima director participating in Africa’s first Wikipedia edit-a-thon on climate change

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Cape Town this week to participate in Africa's first Wikipedia edit-a-thon on climate change. Hosted by CDKN and Future Climate For Africa, the event will bring together researchers from across the African continent who have been involved in a number of major research programmes so that they can update and create new pages to reflect their findings. With an average of 16 billion page views a month, Wikipedia is a common port-of-call for laypeople, and thus using the platform to communicate research findings can improve impact and also help to ensure quality and robustness of information. As she is involved in two major Africa-focused research programmes, Future Climate For Africa and Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia, Katharine's role will be to synthesise findings from across the participants into some of the broader thematic topics.

UMFULA launches new brief projecting future water availability in Lake Malawi and the Shire River basin

The Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project has just released a new brief Projecting water availability in Lake Malawi and the Shire River basin. Led by Dr Ajay Bhave from the University of Leeds, the UMFULA research team has developed an open access water resources model (WEAP) that highlights potential future changes in Lake Malawi water levels and subsequent flows in the Shire River basin. Water availability has implications for energy (hydropower generation), food production (irrigation capacity) and environmental flows (for example through the maintenance of the Elephant Marsh wetland). Results indicate a range of potential futures, which illustrates the importance of adaptive decision-making approaches that are robust to uncertainty in supporting improved water management and infrastructure development in Malawi.

 

Kulima participating in CDKN Knowledge Accelerator lab with DECCMA Ghana team

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Cape Town this week, participating in a CDKN Knowledge Accelerator lab with the DECCMA Ghana team. The Knowledge Accelerator lab forms part of an initiative of CDKN to move "from knowledge to action" in selected African countries. Building on findings from 4.5 years of research on climate change, migration and adaptation in the Volta delta, the DECCMA Ghana team, led by the University of Ghana, submitted a project concept under the call on empowering women and transforming gender relations in the Volta delta, Ghana. The lab will provide the opportunity to further develop the concept into a proposal that supports a transition to gender-responsive adaptation in the delta. Katharine is a member of the multi-stakeholder team, which comprises researchers, policy-makers and practitioners.

Three new UMFULA blogs on the Future Climate For Africa website with inputs from Kulima

The Future Climate For Africa website features three blogs from the UMFULA project with inputs from Kulima. In "Lessons I took away from my first Adaptation Futures Conference" Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema reflects on what she learned at the meeting in Cape Town and its relevance for Malawi. In "Writeshops – key tools for generating outputs in international research projects" Joanna Pardoe (LSE), Katharine Vincent, Rebecka Henriksson Malinga (UKZN) and Neha Mittal (Leeds) reflect on the benefits of sitting together to work on a common output. In "What if applied research projects required a carbon budget, alongside a financial one?" Katharine Vincent considers one way of limiting carbon emissions in international projects.

New paper “Communities of practice. One size does not fit all” in Climate Services

A new paper "Communities of practice. One size does not fit all" is now available online in the journal Climate Services. The paper, by Katharine Vincent, Anna Steynor, Katinka Waagsaether and Tracy Cull, furthers the argument for a nuanced understanding of communities of practice (COPs) that recognises the intradisciplinary and transdisciplinary variants. For successful climate services that enable adaptation to climate change, transdisciplinary COPs are typically required that bring together producers and users. This paper reflects on the role that donor-funded projects can play in supporting the effective generation of sustainable COPs. 

New briefing paper “Policy coherence for sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa” with inputs from Kulima

The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (at the London School of Economics and Political Science) and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy has just released a briefing note "Policy coherence for sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa". The briefing note, written by Patrick Curran, Andy Dougill, Joanna Pardoe and Katharine Vincent, is based on a number of research papers produced under the Future Climate For Africa UMFULA project, which have looked at policy coherence in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. It highlights how sub-optimal levels of coherence of policies and strategies relating to climate change (water, energy and food) could threaten the achievement of the Paris Agreement on climate change and the Sustainable Development Goals.

“Developing and applying a five step process for mainstreaming climate change into local development plans: A case study from Zambia” now available in Climate Risk Management

A new paper "Developing and applying a five step process for mainstreaming climate change into local development plans: A case study from Zambia" has just been published in the journal Climate Risk Management. The paper outlines a process for mainstreaming climate change that was developed for use in the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience districts in western Zambia and applied during several workshops in 2017 for both district development plans and integrated development plans. The process can be used when planning from scratch and also when retrofitting existing plans.

New viewpoint published on the role of sovereign insurance in disaster risk management

Climate and Development has just published a viewpoint article entited "Sovereign insurance to incentivize the shift from disaster response to adaptation to climate change – African Risk Capacity's Extreme Climate Facility". The article, led by Kulima director Dr Katharine Vincent, arose out of project between Kulima and the Frankfurt School (UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate and Sustainable Energy Finance) that took place between 2015-16. The project developed criteria for evaluation of adaptation investment plans to be submitted by countries participating in a new sovereign climate insurance product under African Risk Capacity, the Extreme Climate Facility (XCF). The viewpoint argues that there is a role for leveraging private finance through insurance as part of the range of risk management strategies required to adapt to climate change.

Kulima director participating in UMFULA writeshop on institutional responses to climate change

Dr Katharine Vincent is participating in a writeshop this week with her colleague on the UMFULA project (Future Climate For Africa programme), Dr Joanna Pardoe from the Grantham Research Institute for Climate and Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science. As part of the research into the use of climate information in decision-making, the UMFULA team has been investigating the institutional architecture around climate change in Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia. Additionally they have administered a survey to public sector staff in the three countries to investigate motivations and perceived agency to act on climate change issues. The writeshop will bring together some of these findings in two academic papers.