Tag Archives: food security

Kulima director in Kisumu for meeting of the GCRF project “Building research capacity for sustainable water and food security in sub-Saharan Africa”

Dr Katharine Vincent is in Kisumu in Kenya this week to participate in the a meeting of the "Building research capacity for sustainable water and food security in sub-Saharan Africa" (BRECcIA) project. BRECcIA is a four year project funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) and led by the University of Southampton. It aims to develop research capacity across institutions in Malawi, Kenya and Ghana that is self-sustaining and focused on improving food and water security for the poorest of society. Katharine is a member of the strategic advisory board for the project.

Kulima director participates in IPCC Expert Meeting on Climate Change, Food and Agriculture

kids in the fieldsDr Katharine Vincent is in Dublin this week to participate in the IPCC Expert Meeting on Climate Change, Food and Agriculture. She will be making a presentation on "Food production and food security" during a plenary session which gives an overview of food security. The expert meeting is being convened as a result of a decision by the IPCC bureau at its 40th session to consider existing information on the topic, and to recommend possible further action, including the options of producing a Technical Paper or Special Report, or to address the matter in the forthcoming assessment cycle. Katharine was also one of 13 members of the meeting's planning committee.

START issues its 2012 call for grant awards: global environmental change, agriculture and food security

START, the global change SysTem for Analysis, Research and Training, has just announced the 2012 Call for Proposals (CFP) for Global Environmental Change (GEC) Research in Africa on the theme of global environmental change, agriculture and food security.  The 2012 round of GEC grants will build directly on the 2011 Africa GEC grants (http://start.org/programs/africangec) that focused on how climatic and environmental changes potentially impact ecosystem services critical to agriculture and food and livelihood security in arid, semi-arid, sub-humid, and humid environments as well as for communities dependent on coastal marine systems.

The deadline for submission of proposals is midnight (2400 hours), US Eastern Standard Time, on 28 March 2012 and all submissions should be submitted electronically to proposals@start.org (DOWNLOAD THE 2012 APPLICATION FORM HERE).  Kulima is particularly excited to see the criteria that successful proposals will contain a communications and outreach strategy.

 

Kulima presents at “Experience-based disaster risk reduction in southeast Africa and the southwest Indian Ocean islands”

Dr Katharine Vincent attended a workshop on “Experience-based disaster risk reduction in southeast Africa and the southwest Indian Ocean islands”, hosted by FAO and Care as part of the EU ECHO/DIPECHO food security disaster risk reduction project.  Kulima was contracted earlier in 2011 to undertake a study of the sustainability of introducing early-maturing seeds as a food security disaster risk reduction intervention, involving field visits to Madagascar, Malawi and Mozambique.  Katharine presented the findings of the study at the meeting.  Over 80 people attended from the three focal countries, as well as elsewhere in the region, representing government, NGOs and UN agencies.

Kulima collaborates with FAO to investigate sustainability of short-cycle seeds

Kulima is collaborating with FAO to assess the sustainability of a project distributing short-cycle seeds in Madagascar, Mozambique and Malawi.  The Food Security and Disaster Risk Reduction project, funded by the European Union (ECHO/DIPECHO) has distributed short-cycle seed varieties with the aim of improving food security in the context of exposure to floods and cyclones.  In Madagascar, the X265 and “Mihary” rice varieties mature in 90 days, compared with 120 days for traditional seeds.  This means that farmers can produce two crops per year, instead of just one, and the likelihood of crops being destroyed by cyclones just prior to harvest is reduced, thereby ensuring food security in the following season.