Tag Archives: co-production

“Tailored climate projections to assess site-specific vulnerability of tea production” New paper with inputs from Kulima

A new paper “Tailored climate projections to assess site-specific vulnerability of tea production” has just been published in the journal Climate Risk Management. The paper, led by Neha Mittal with a team that included Katharine Vincent, draws on research conducted across a variety of contexts conducted under the Future Climate for Africa programme, explains the process of co-producing decision-relevant climate information to enable adaptation within the tea sector in Malawi and Kenya.

Tailored climate change information is essential to understand future climate risks and identify relevant adaptation strategies. However, distilling and effectively communicating decision-relevant information from climate science remains challenging. The paper presents the development and application of an iterative stakeholder engagement approach and a Site Specific Synthesis of Projected Range (SPR), to co-produce future climate information for Africa’s largest tea producing nations – Kenya and Malawi – for the mid-and late-21st century. SPR demonstrates site-specificity, showing risks of large changes in tea crop sensitive metrics, notably substantial increases in heatwave days and large decreases in cold nights by 2050s compared to the current climate. Having this information enables stakeholders in the tea sector to identify location-specific adaptation strategies and investment priorities, potentially safeguarding supply- chains and millions of livelihoods.

“Mobilizing Climate Information for Decision-Making in Africa: Contrasting User-Centered and Knowledge-Centered Approaches” New paper with inputs from Kulima

A new paper "Mobilizing Climate Information for Decision-Making in Africa: Contrasting User-Centered and Knowledge-Centered Approaches" has just been published in the journal Frontiers in Climate. The paper, led by Blane Harvey with an author team that includes Katharine Vincent, examines the ways in which climate information was mobilized for use under the Future Climate for Africa programme. Document analysis of outputs and key informant inteviews shows that, within the programme, a total of 20 knowledge mobilization tools and approaches were identified and used. There was a complex interplay between user engagement and knowledge mobilization processes, including the strategic or flexible use and re-use of knowledge products as the user engagement process evolved. These findings have important implications for future attempts to promote improved use of climate information in decision-making.

“Climate Risk in Africa. Adaptation and Resilience” New edited book with inputs from Kulima

An edited volume "Climate Risk in Africa. Adaptation and Resilience" has just been released, documenting the experiences across the Future Climate For Africa programme. The book, co-edited by Declan Conway and Katharine Vincent, explains how adaptation is a learning process that requires the bringing together of lots of people with different knowledge and experiences. It showcases various ways in which scientists partnered and worked with decision-makers – through co-production, transdisciplinary partnerships and multi-stakeholder engagement processes – to generate decision-relevant climate information to enable effective adaptation to climate change. Case studies cover a range of African countries, including Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia, Uganda, Kenya and Burkina Faso, and sectors from agriculture to water to urban planning.

“Addressing power imbalances in co-production” New comment in Nature Climate Change, led by Kulima

A new comment "Addressing power imbalances in co-production" has just been published in Nature Climate Change. The comment, led by Katharine Vincent with Suzanne Carter, Anna Steynor, Emma Visman and Katinka Lund Waagsaether, reflects on investigations into co-production in the Future Climate For Africa and WISER programmes. Co-production is an increasingly popular approach to knowledge generation encouraged by donors and research funders. However, power dynamics between institutions in the global North and South can, if not adequately managed, impede the effectiveness of co-production and pose risks for long-term sustainability.

WISER and Future Climate For Africa issue new policy brief on co-production with inputs from Kulima

WISER and Future Climate For Africa have just launched a policy brief on the Building blocks for co-producing climate services. The policy brief is one of a series of outputs led by a joint WISER-FCFA team, comprising Suzanne Carter, Anna Steynor, Katharine Vincent, Emma Visman and Katinka Lund Waagsaether. It follows a Manual on co-production in weather and climate services and two webinars: one on the building blocks of co-production, and the other on ten principles behind good co-production. It summarises emerging lessons on co-producing climate services in Africa from the two programmes, highlighting who should be involved and what the process might look like.

Importance of FCFA work with tea farmers highlighted by Malawi heatwave

A recent heatwave in Malawi has highlighted the risk that climate change poses to the tea farming sector. Future Climate For Africa's CI4Tea project has been working with tea farmers and other sector stakeholders in the southern districts of Mulanje and Thyolo to co-produce decision-relevant climate information. Occurrence of consecutive very hot days, as was experienced at the end of October, was highlighted as a major concern. Evidence of leaf scorch and the inevitable impacts on yields have underlined the importance of planning for a changed future climate. CI4Tea's work has therefore been publicised on the Future Climate For Africa website and Climate Home News and accompanied by a short film on Climate Change and Tea: Challenges for Malawi and Kenya.

New WISER and Future Climate For Africa manual “Co-production in African Weather and Climate Services” with inputs from Kulima

The Weather and Climate Information Services for Africa (WISER) and Future Climate For Africa (FCFA) programmes have just launched a new manual, Co-production in African weather and climate services. The manual, written by Suzanne Carter, Anna Steynor, Katharine Vincent, Emma Visman and Katinka Lund Waagsaether outlines building blocks and principles for co-production, distilled from a variety of experiences of co-producing weather and climate services across the continent. It is supplemented by a compendium of case studies from a range of different programmes. The manual concludes that, whilst co-production is often a resource intensive process and needs to be adequately supported both in terms of funding and time, the added value can result in significant benefits for weather and climate services.

New working paper led by Kulima “Creating useful and usable weather and climate information-Insights from Participatory Scenario Planning in Malawi

The Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy and the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment has just released a new working paper led by Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema and Katharine Vincent, with Rebecka Henriksson Malinga from the University of KwaZulu Natal. The paper, Creating useful and usable weather and climate information-Insights from Participatory Scenario Planning in Malawi, is an output of the Future Climate For Africa programme's UMFULA project. Based on qualitative research, it finds that advisories co-produced through the Participatory Scenario Planning process have been used by farmers to successfully reduce risk. However the scaling up and sustainability has been challenged by technical constraints relating to delays in the release of the national seasonal forecast and staff availability, and financial constraints which limit the extent to which the process can be carried out at district level. These challenges are reinforced by the lack of a policy framework.

New open access paper “What can climate services learn from theory and practice of co-production?”

A new paper "What can climate services learn from theory and practice of co-production?" has just been made available online in the journal Climate Services. The paper, led by Kulima director Dr Katharine Vincent with co-authors Meaghan Daly, Claire Scannell and Bill Leathes, is an output of two projects funded by DFIDUMFULA (Future Climate for Africa) and Weather and Climate Information Services for Africa (WISER). Co-produced climate services are increasingly recognised as a means of improving the effective generation and utilisation of climate information to inform decision-making and support adaptation to climate change, particularly in developing countries. The paper reviews the co-production literature in other science policy fields to distil some key principles to inform climate services. A co-produced climate service product should be decision-driven, process-based and time-managed, whilst the process of co-producing a climate service should be inclusive, collaborative and flexible. Illustrations are also provided of how these principles may be engaged in practice.

Kulima participating in UMFULA annual meeting in Dar es Salaam

Dr Katharine Vincent and Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema are representing Kulima this week at the annual meeting of the UMFULA project (part of the Future Climate For Africa programme) in Dar es Salaam. The meeting brings together the climate scientists, impact modellers and social scientists from the UK, South Africa, Malawi, Tanzania and Cameroon to feed back on research findings and, with less than a year until the end of the project, to synthesise emerging lessons. It will be followed by a range of stakeholder events, including presentations to the Tanzania Meteorological Agency and TANESCO (electricity company), and a student session at the University of Dar es Salaam.